fbpx

Japanese rail travel

In Japan, rail travel is a significant mode of passenger transportation, particularly for high-speed, mass transit between large cities and for commuter transportation in urban regions. Just 0.84% of the movement of goods use it for freight transportation, which is a very small percentage. The privatized network runs extremely punctually, efficiently, and with minimal support. …

Cormorants and Ukai

It should come as no surprise that Japan is home to various species of cormorant given that the country’s coastline measures 29,751 km (larger even than Australia’s: 25,760 km) and there are numerous islands. The most uncommon of the four is the Red-faced Cormorant, which breeds locally in southeast Hokkaido at the farthest southwestern extent …

Seals and Sea Lions in Japan

During the winter and spring, from December to May, large numbers of Northern Fur Seal, an abundant ear seal, move south into Japanese seas following the chilly Oyashio river. During those months, they can be found far out at sea, along the coast of the Sea of Okhotsk, and further south, along the Pacific and …

Spirits of Darkness – Shrews

The two largest mammals in Japan, the brown bear and the Asiatic black bear, seek to escape the cold by withdrawing into a den and going into torpor. The 12 species of shrews, the tiniest animals in Japan, cannot afford to rest because they would freeze to death if they dozed off for an extended …

Most voracious predators in Japan

The snow layer bulges and explodes, revealing a creamy-faced creature with tiny black beads for eyes and a look that seems to be saying, “I can kill.” Its head is dusted with powder snow as it scans the area. The visage then vanished in an instant, like a periscope slipping beneath the snow. A few …

Eurasian Red Squirrel in Japan

Only on Hokkaido does the widely dispersed Eurasian Red Squirrel exist, and the island’s lowland and montane forests are home to this species. While coniferous evergreen woods and, in particular, mixed deciduous and evergreen conifer forests are where it is most likely to be found, it likes deciduous broadleaf forests where it can graze among …

Red-crowned Crane – Symbol of Happiness and Longevity

The Red-crowned Crane is the most northern animal to represent Japan. You could be excused for thinking that is one of the most frequent birds in Japan. It most definitely is in symbolic form. They can be found on everything from saké bottle labels to bridal kimonos, elevator doors to chopsticks, while millions of origami …

The Winter Angels in Japan

The Whooper Swan, the swan with the greatest geographic range, is a frequent winter visitor to Japan, especially in northern Hokkaido and northern Honshu. These swans migrate south from their boreal breeding sites in Russia due to the early autumn icing, which can trap immature cygnets or even cut them off from their food source. …

The Seabird Island of Teuri-to

Imagine the following: complete darkness, a brisk wind, swirling, increasing fog, and the unceasing slamming of waves against a rocky shore. You could assume that this isn’t the kind of night for nature observation, but you’d be wrong. There is a scene of chaos and insanity at the southern cape of Teuri Island, known as …

Night of the Swimming Dead: Japanese Salmonids

For some, this self-sacrificing process can be referred to as “the night of the swimming dead” because it is necessary before the rebirth of a new year is conceivable. It is the salmon running, which comes to an end in the major northern rivers as the year turns, not some new celebration celebrating ghosts. Cold …